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Archive for the ‘childhood’ Category

The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 22, 1919

They were discussing the raising of children at the chamber of commerce show recently and Dr. Maude Wiley, in charge of the Welfare league, told an amusing story. Seems the little girl had been spanked by her father for disobeying. With tears running down her cheeks she ran to her mother, crying, “I think papa’s perfectly horrid. Was he the only man you could get?”

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The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 8, 1919

He Raised It

This little boy has hoed and watered this beet all summer long. It is so perfect in scale that it is to be exhibited for a prize at the show.

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The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 8, 1919

Grandfather is a learned Indiana professor – one who is greatly respected by all his neighbors and acquaintances. But his little three-year old granddaughter knows him quite another way from any other person, as the bestower of anything she may wish. The other evening his mother left her with grandfather while she went to a party. For a while everything went all right and then the baby began to get sleepy. At the same time she longed for mother to tuck her in bed. Then she pitched her voice high and wailed loud and long.

Grandfather presented money, trinkets and everything the house offered but still the baby wailed. More presents, and finally the baby took enough notice to utter this rebuke: “I want oo to know I’m tryin’ for my mudder.”

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The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 8, 1919

Customary figure as the boy scout has become in the United States, General Baden-Powell’s visit added much to American knowledge of the movement. A good many newspaper readers were probably surprised to learn that it owes its beginning to the Boer war and the siege of Mafeking, without which it may be questioned whether there would be any boy scouts. In command at Mafeking, General Baden-Powell looked far beyond the siege and saw that a great and useful organization of boys might be developed from the corps of boy messengers organized to serve the forces holding that hard-pressed town. That was the beginning of it, but the same force of character that defended Mafeking carried forward the boy scout idea until it was generally recognized as a project for character building rather than encouraging militarism in the young. Another bit of information that probably surprised many Americans was that Baden-Powell is descended on his mother’s side from Capt. John Smith.

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