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Archive for the ‘social history’ Category

The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 22, 1919

They were discussing the raising of children at the chamber of commerce show recently and Dr. Maude Wiley, in charge of the Welfare league, told an amusing story. Seems the little girl had been spanked by her father for disobeying. With tears running down her cheeks she ran to her mother, crying, “I think papa’s perfectly horrid. Was he the only man you could get?”

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The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 22, 1919

The early Britons were expert in needlework, and the earliest (British) Church of England before the fifth century won fame from its “handmaids of the church,” who made linens and altar frontals for numberless churches in Europe. Tapestry, the work of queens like Matilda and noble ladies in olden times was largely needlework.

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The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 22, 1919

Si Colwell was taking a well earned rest, after several months of strenuous endeavor. He was known as one of the village cut-ups in his time.

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Harry Pearce denied that he was ever identified with the bootlegging business, except at the receiving end. That was about right.

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Babe Ruth, the 300-pound beauty at 706 North Steenth street, was spending a few days’ vacation with East End friends.

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Walter Bell defeated Frank Douglas at pinochle for two buckets of near-beer. They were great gamblers in their time.

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Gus Christensen was caught with a suspicious slooking pop bottle, but was able to explain the contents to his old friend, Peter Ault, with whom he was forced to divide the “pop.”

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Tommy Toy discovered a leak in his copper-lined hip pocket. It cost Lou Adams a lot of money before the leak was discovered.

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Bob Heller, formerly known as a leader in the sporting world, paid his subscription to The Mediator, a matter which indicated good judgement.

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Jimmy Ford took a day off to explain the dangerous points of Omaha social life to several delighted audiences. He was a great entertainer.

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Ruth McLane, North Seventeenth street, had numerous callers last week. A lot of newspaper boys had considerable explaining to do. Mr. Moore was on the spot.

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Andy Gallagher, well known philanthropist, called on North End friends during the week and contributed to various charities in that end of our great religious city.

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Emil Hoffman and his mighty collection of musicians were again on the job at our opera house on Harney street. He had some good recipes for nearly beer.

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The story about Dan Butler, well known city commissioner, being engaged to marry was denied. He said he already had enough troubles.

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All that bunk about Ossifer Petersen finding two smacks in his coat pocket was awfully funny for the boys on the force. Somebody nearly carried the joke too far.

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Harry Pullman was still sticking around town, working at his old job. He was one of the villages’s industrious hustlers.

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Ray Lones and some of his companions made midnight calls on friends in a Douglas street apartment. Ray said some of his friends were touched, but nobody believed anything he said.

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*Blogger’s Disclaimer: Before you decide to read this article, just be warned that there is some very racist language used towards a Japanese individual. The views expressed here are not my own, I do not endorse racism, 1919’s or otherwise. I just believe in presenting history as is actually was, and that we do ourselves a disservice if we whitewash it to make it more acceptable to modern society. As with all the articles I post here, this is a faithful transcription of an article as it appeared, nothing more. So please don’t send me any hate mail. Thanks for reading!

The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 22, 1919

Jessie Taylor and Her Underworld Associates Caught in Police Dragnet

Second Hand Dealer Collects Cash

Sob Story Told of How Once Pretty Woman Falls Victim of Wily Jap, Who Abandons Her for Frances Fitzpatrick; Hotel Man Succeeds Jap.

The arrest a few days ago of Jessie Taylor, in her double apartment at 710-12 North Sixteenth street, where it was charged she operated an ill-governed house, becomes an interesting item of society news, because of her former friendship with a heathen Jap named Osato. The Jap married Miss Frances Fitzpatrick, a society belle, last January.

When the bulls went to Miss Taylor’s apartment to arrest her and the inmates they found hanging above the couch a large framed picture of Osato, of whom she had once been so fond. In fact, it is stated by other tenants of this well known old rookery that Osato once was madly in love with this denizen of the underworld. When he became acquainted with Miss Fitzpatrick, however, Jessie lost out completely and continued stronger than ever in her evil ways.

Jessie has had a remarkable record during her occupation of the gilded palace of sin, if all reports are true. She has two flats at the above number and when the police swooped down on her they took Jessie and two other girls and their companions and a substantial assortment of hard liquor.

In the patrol wagon they were bundled away to the police station. Arriving there Miss Taylor found no former Japanese sweetheart to go on her bond and was sent to the booby hatch with her companions. Miss Taylor still retains much of her youthful handsomeness and it is easy to understand why Osato should have been attracted to her. Is is said, however, that the sweet young society girl stole away his heart and that her marriage to the Jap quite upset the unfortunate woman of the underworld.

The wedding between Miss Fitzpatrick and Osato created a sensation the like of which had not before upset the equilibrium of Omaha society. He is a photographer and it is said he does a good business on West Farnham street, where he has a studio.

The fair maid whose attentions he sought and later spurned remained in her gilded palace in the Mardis block. Spurned by her Japanese lover, she quickly went from bad to worse. In physical altercations with others she is said to have “razored” one woman and scalped another during her abnormal bibulousness.

When Osato abandoned Jessie there came a Sixteenth street furniture man to succeed to her affections. He was more solicitous of her money, however, than anything else. She had lived at his third-class hostelry down the Sixteenth street row. He saw an opportunity to merchandise Jessie and “set her up in business.” He has been the collector daily at that Mardis block joint ever since. His name is Ike and he buys and sells second-hand furniture in the building adjoining the California hotel, of which he was formerly manager.

There is really a tale of sadness in this story. Jessie Taylor has seen better days – when she did not have to depend on the heathens and unscrupulous second-hand dealers for love tokens and an existence. When she appeared in court there still remained a twinkle of the eye which indicated those better days. But she had been sent the “route.” Even this heathen Jap, ensconced in the bosom of a Christian society girl, had passed her up. Her junk peddling friend collected her money daily and robbed her of most of the earnings she was able to accumulate, as well as those of the unfortunate women she harbored.

It was a lesson in sobs, depicting more things than the outside world ever dreamed of.

The heathen Jap still enjoys life with a white wife and has the respect of West End society.

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The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 22, 1919

Too Much Regard for Omaha Widow Seems Likely to Make Grief for Up-State Barrister.

In the recent doings of persons interested in the Blakeley divorce suit there has come to light a racy letter written by an up-state barrister to an Omaha widow, which may prove to be a boomerang to the writer. It appears this letter dropped into the hands of an unkind newspaper man is causing several parties a lot of grief. It is said to come from a southern Nebraska town, once famous for its fine little brewery. The barrister, according to the latter, is crazy about the widow. Some of it is said to be unprintable.

In forthcoming developments it is expected this letter will cut quite a figure in the legal working out of a bad snare.

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The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 15, 1919

Dr. J. S. Long of Washington D.C., president of the Gallaudet College Alumni association, will attend the Nebraska State Association of the Deaf, which meets in Omaha, August 15-18, as one of the principal speakers, and will talk on “How the Deaf of Iowa Organized and Accomplished Results.” Henry W. Rothert, former superintendent of the Iowa School for the Deaf, will speak on ,’My Experience with Methods of Educating the Deaf.” “Vital Problems Confronting the Nebraska Deaf” will be discussed by R. E. Stewart. Mayor Ed P. Smith will welcome the visitors and Tom L. Anderson of Minden, Neb., will respond to the mayor’s welcome.

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The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 8, 1919

Mrs. Mabel Harden, pretty telephone operator for Hastings & Hayden, realtors on Harney street, likes to read the Mediator. She receives the mail for the big institution and when her favorite weekly newspaper appeared two late last week she filed her complaint with the head of the firm. Byron Hastings likes to please his employes so he sent out and bought a copy from a down town news stand when his own paper did not appear Saturday morning.

Mrs. Harden’s choice of literature is a good one and she cannot be blamed for complaining when this paper fails to show up on time. Incidentially, this fine little woman is a big asset in this real estate office and is always full of information. Her disposition is so cheerful that even the high cost of living and the hot weather do not disturb her even temper.

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