Feeds:
Posts
Comments

The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 22, 1919

Many old time actors and actresses, who have in recent years joined the “movies,” held a reunion in New York the other day to talk over old times and new creations. It was a time for reminiscence and they enjoyed the occasion to the fullest extent.

Actors who trod the boards ten and fifteen years ago together in a play that thrilled New York, had a reunion last week. They talked over the olden days when movies knew their place and left the drama in peace.

The players were members of the cast that supported Amelia Bingham in “The Climbers.” The place of their reunion was nothing more or less than the Vitagarph Brooklyn studio.

The films had finally reached out and gathered these artists. They will reproduce on celluloid the play that made them famous.

Frank Loomis, casting director for the Vitagraph, believes he has accomplished a notable feat in mobilizing the principal players of “The Climbers” to appear in Vitagraph’s reproduction of that state success.

Miss Corinne Griffith will play the star’s role. Tom Terriss is director. James Spottswood, who played the role of Trotter in the state version, with Miss Bingham, repeats that performance in the film. Percy Marmont, also a member of the earlier cast, is in the film. Miss Emily Fitzroy, a well known state favorite, has an important part.

Observations

The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 22, 1919

Senator Hitchcock’s newspaper is getting worried about who Omaha will offer as a gubernatorial candidate next year. It is a safe bet our mayor will be side-stepped at the convention.

__________

The fact that the entire country has gone “dry” does not appear to interfere with the little game known as “bootlegging.” Fifteen bootleggers were on hand Monday morning in police court.

__________

After awhile Omaha people will begin to appreciate what the Woodmen of the World is doing for our city. Also what  great, big man is W. A. Fraser.

__________

Mr. Shotwell says he can find no way to punish food profiteers in Douglas county. He is about the only county attorney in the country that feels that way.

__________

Some large department stores attempted to corner up the stock of government stores in Omaha, but did not get away with it. One big concern had to return a big consignment of blankets.

__________

The policemen have organized to secure an increase in pay. It is about time. The firemen got away with theirs – why not the police?

__________

The attempt of landlords to squeeze the tenant is being looked into. It is about time. A lot of these vicious landlords were preparing to inaugurate a system worse than that in vogue in England.

__________

There appears to be no lack of rottenness in Omaha, despite the worthy effort of Police Commissioner Elmer Thomas.

__________

Mr. Ringer will return to the city next week to assist Superintendent Thomas of the police department.

Time For Action In Mexico

The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 22, 1919

The time has just about arrived for Uncle Sam to take the bull by the horns in Mexico and settle that vexatious question once and for all. The continued depredations by itinerant Mexican desperadoes on American people has become so exasperating that it cannot be overlooked for a great length of time.

The exploitation of Mexico by Americans in recent years has had a bad effect in some instances, but as a general proposition it has been a good thing for the country. Mexico covers a very wide area and has not had a responsible head for a decade. The natural result has been that the machinery of government has decayed and become almost useless as power to police the various states.

What is required in Mexico is a power similar to the power that civilized the Hawaiian and Philippine groups and brought to them stable government. Sooner or later that power will have to be furnished by some substantial nation that can enforce its dictates for good and stable government in Mexico.

Our people have taken much from Mexico and tried to get along with the people of that country. Mexico has not progressed like other new countries, either in education or the art of government. On the other hand, it has decayed. Far-seeing men, with an eye to developing the natural resources of that country, have invested great sums of money. It is too late to stop the advance in that development.

When the Mexican is educated to decent living, to the value of thrift and to the necessity for advancing instead of declining, then and not until then will that country progress. It has just about come to the point where Uncle Sam will be forced to take a hand in bringing about a stable government, even if it takes an army to do it.

The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 22, 1919

Si Colwell was taking a well earned rest, after several months of strenuous endeavor. He was known as one of the village cut-ups in his time.

__________

Harry Pearce denied that he was ever identified with the bootlegging business, except at the receiving end. That was about right.

__________

Babe Ruth, the 300-pound beauty at 706 North Steenth street, was spending a few days’ vacation with East End friends.

__________

Walter Bell defeated Frank Douglas at pinochle for two buckets of near-beer. They were great gamblers in their time.

__________

Gus Christensen was caught with a suspicious slooking pop bottle, but was able to explain the contents to his old friend, Peter Ault, with whom he was forced to divide the “pop.”

__________

Tommy Toy discovered a leak in his copper-lined hip pocket. It cost Lou Adams a lot of money before the leak was discovered.

__________

Bob Heller, formerly known as a leader in the sporting world, paid his subscription to The Mediator, a matter which indicated good judgement.

__________

Jimmy Ford took a day off to explain the dangerous points of Omaha social life to several delighted audiences. He was a great entertainer.

__________

Ruth McLane, North Seventeenth street, had numerous callers last week. A lot of newspaper boys had considerable explaining to do. Mr. Moore was on the spot.

__________

Andy Gallagher, well known philanthropist, called on North End friends during the week and contributed to various charities in that end of our great religious city.

__________

Emil Hoffman and his mighty collection of musicians were again on the job at our opera house on Harney street. He had some good recipes for nearly beer.

__________

The story about Dan Butler, well known city commissioner, being engaged to marry was denied. He said he already had enough troubles.

__________

All that bunk about Ossifer Petersen finding two smacks in his coat pocket was awfully funny for the boys on the force. Somebody nearly carried the joke too far.

__________

Harry Pullman was still sticking around town, working at his old job. He was one of the villages’s industrious hustlers.

__________

Ray Lones and some of his companions made midnight calls on friends in a Douglas street apartment. Ray said some of his friends were touched, but nobody believed anything he said.

The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 22, 1919

Enough Stored to Last Year and Prices Going Higher; Authorities Refuse to Act Against Criminals Responsible For This Condition.

There are enough eggs stored in Omaha today for every man, woman and child in the city to have one egg a day each for a whole year, without bringing another egg into the city. This is aside from frozen eggs, of which there are enough to furnish one a one-half eggs for each of them one day for a second year. The people of Omaha are paying 45 cents a dozen for eggs.

During the next year a conservative estimate is that 10,000,000 eggs will be permitted to go to waste, in order to keep up the price of hen fruit. That is one of the secrets to the present high cost of living.

There is also in storage in the city 12,000 tons of meats, or 24,000,000 pounds. Of butter there is one and a half million pounds in storage. If the Union stockyards were closed for ten months there would still be enough meat left to supply the city for a year. With the normal receipts of live stock and other commodities the Omaha market will receive enough products within the next year to supply the city for twelve years, even if another pound was not received.

These are the conditions, just as they exist. It means that the most ungodly system of profiteering that ever was heard of is in existence. It means that a coterie of gangsters have combined to hold up the consumers of the country to the last cent that the peace of the country will stand for. In cities other than Omaha the officials are taking the bull by the horns. In Omaha the ring that is bleeding the public is working daily and getting away with not even serious censure.

There is in storage in Omaha 54,000 pounds of iced rabbits. When the rabbit season opens in October they will be placed on sale and the fresh rabbits will be stored for next year. What is left over will go to the dump to be buried. Some of the produce dealers of Omaha have had the nerve to say that they had a right to let their stuff decay and rot if they so desired and it was nobody’s business.

This is the situation that has come to light as a result of an abortive attempt to get at the bottom of the high cost of living. Our county attorney has not even ventured to suggest to the district judges a grand jury to probe conditions as they exist.

There is absolutely no excuse for this condition. Storage houses are keeping the prices from going higher, not because of patriotism, but because they do not have room enough to handle more produce and thus keep it away from the consumer. With capacity for storing twice the amount now in cold storage, prices would be twice as high. Thrice as much food as is now being wasted would go into the sewers, in order to maintain the high scale of food prices.

These are actual facts. They cannot be controverted. If our law-enforcing powers so desire they can improve the situation bountifully. If they maintain their present silence and inactivity pries will go still higher. It is the plain duty of the people to either force them all into activity or put the whole bunch out of office, city, county and state.

*Blogger’s Disclaimer: Before you decide to read this article, just be warned that there is some very racist language used towards a Japanese individual. The views expressed here are not my own, I do not endorse racism, 1919’s or otherwise. I just believe in presenting history as is actually was, and that we do ourselves a disservice if we whitewash it to make it more acceptable to modern society. As with all the articles I post here, this is a faithful transcription of an article as it appeared, nothing more. So please don’t send me any hate mail. Thanks for reading!

The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 22, 1919

Jessie Taylor and Her Underworld Associates Caught in Police Dragnet

Second Hand Dealer Collects Cash

Sob Story Told of How Once Pretty Woman Falls Victim of Wily Jap, Who Abandons Her for Frances Fitzpatrick; Hotel Man Succeeds Jap.

The arrest a few days ago of Jessie Taylor, in her double apartment at 710-12 North Sixteenth street, where it was charged she operated an ill-governed house, becomes an interesting item of society news, because of her former friendship with a heathen Jap named Osato. The Jap married Miss Frances Fitzpatrick, a society belle, last January.

When the bulls went to Miss Taylor’s apartment to arrest her and the inmates they found hanging above the couch a large framed picture of Osato, of whom she had once been so fond. In fact, it is stated by other tenants of this well known old rookery that Osato once was madly in love with this denizen of the underworld. When he became acquainted with Miss Fitzpatrick, however, Jessie lost out completely and continued stronger than ever in her evil ways.

Jessie has had a remarkable record during her occupation of the gilded palace of sin, if all reports are true. She has two flats at the above number and when the police swooped down on her they took Jessie and two other girls and their companions and a substantial assortment of hard liquor.

In the patrol wagon they were bundled away to the police station. Arriving there Miss Taylor found no former Japanese sweetheart to go on her bond and was sent to the booby hatch with her companions. Miss Taylor still retains much of her youthful handsomeness and it is easy to understand why Osato should have been attracted to her. Is is said, however, that the sweet young society girl stole away his heart and that her marriage to the Jap quite upset the unfortunate woman of the underworld.

The wedding between Miss Fitzpatrick and Osato created a sensation the like of which had not before upset the equilibrium of Omaha society. He is a photographer and it is said he does a good business on West Farnham street, where he has a studio.

The fair maid whose attentions he sought and later spurned remained in her gilded palace in the Mardis block. Spurned by her Japanese lover, she quickly went from bad to worse. In physical altercations with others she is said to have “razored” one woman and scalped another during her abnormal bibulousness.

When Osato abandoned Jessie there came a Sixteenth street furniture man to succeed to her affections. He was more solicitous of her money, however, than anything else. She had lived at his third-class hostelry down the Sixteenth street row. He saw an opportunity to merchandise Jessie and “set her up in business.” He has been the collector daily at that Mardis block joint ever since. His name is Ike and he buys and sells second-hand furniture in the building adjoining the California hotel, of which he was formerly manager.

There is really a tale of sadness in this story. Jessie Taylor has seen better days – when she did not have to depend on the heathens and unscrupulous second-hand dealers for love tokens and an existence. When she appeared in court there still remained a twinkle of the eye which indicated those better days. But she had been sent the “route.” Even this heathen Jap, ensconced in the bosom of a Christian society girl, had passed her up. Her junk peddling friend collected her money daily and robbed her of most of the earnings she was able to accumulate, as well as those of the unfortunate women she harbored.

It was a lesson in sobs, depicting more things than the outside world ever dreamed of.

The heathen Jap still enjoys life with a white wife and has the respect of West End society.

The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 22, 1919

The One Minute cafe, at 418 South Fifteenth street, has been purchased by Amos Abley and John Christensen, who will operate it in the future. The “One Minute” has an enviable record as an Omaha eating place. Originally it was opened on the site of the Henshaw hotel, nearly thirty years ago. When that hotel was built the place was sold to an employe, who moved to the present location and the cafe has been operated there ever since.

No Omaha restaurant, not even the Calumet, on Douglas street, has had a more continuous and successful business. The famous English teapot, which for twenty-five years stood in the front window as a sign, is still in the hands of the One Minute owners.

The new owners have given the One Minute a thorough overhauling, renovating and new decorations. New table linen has been purchased throughout.