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Archive for the ‘human interest’ Category

The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 22, 1919

February 17 is the anniversary of the burning in Rome, in 1600, of the Italian philosopher, Giordano Bruno. He was subjected to continual and terrible persecution for seven years prior to his death, in the hope that he would recant. In 1889 a monument was erected to him under papal protest at the place where he perished at the stake.

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The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 22, 1919

The early Britons were expert in needlework, and the earliest (British) Church of England before the fifth century won fame from its “handmaids of the church,” who made linens and altar frontals for numberless churches in Europe. Tapestry, the work of queens like Matilda and noble ladies in olden times was largely needlework.

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The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 22, 1919

Many old time actors and actresses, who have in recent years joined the “movies,” held a reunion in New York the other day to talk over old times and new creations. It was a time for reminiscence and they enjoyed the occasion to the fullest extent.

Actors who trod the boards ten and fifteen years ago together in a play that thrilled New York, had a reunion last week. They talked over the olden days when movies knew their place and left the drama in peace.

The players were members of the cast that supported Amelia Bingham in “The Climbers.” The place of their reunion was nothing more or less than the Vitagarph Brooklyn studio.

The films had finally reached out and gathered these artists. They will reproduce on celluloid the play that made them famous.

Frank Loomis, casting director for the Vitagraph, believes he has accomplished a notable feat in mobilizing the principal players of “The Climbers” to appear in Vitagraph’s reproduction of that state success.

Miss Corinne Griffith will play the star’s role. Tom Terriss is director. James Spottswood, who played the role of Trotter in the state version, with Miss Bingham, repeats that performance in the film. Percy Marmont, also a member of the earlier cast, is in the film. Miss Emily Fitzroy, a well known state favorite, has an important part.

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The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 8, 1919

The weaver birds of South Africa join forces. Scores of pairs nest together under a huge umbrella-shaped structure which they build by their combined labor. Some of these amazing co-operative nests contain a good cartload of grass.

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The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 8, 1919

Capt. Klaus Larson, in his little motor boat Ferro, made a successful trip from the foot of the cataract through the Whirlpool rapids of Niagara falls on September 19, 1910. Despite the battering of the Whirlpool rapids Larsen went through safely; the little boat was lost to sight most of the time, but at Great Wave it was shot 20 feet out of the water. Except the old Maid of the Mist, sent through in 1864 to avoid seizure, Larsen’s is the only engine-propelled craft to have gone through the rapids.

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The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 8, 1919

Dwellers in Mountains of Tyrol Live In Much the Same Way as Did Their Ancestors.

The mountains of Tyrol shelter one of the few remaining unspoiled peasant people of Europe – a people that wears a native costume, remembers its folk legends and follows customs centuries old.

The mountain Tyrolese are robust, hard-working folk. Life in the mountains demands work from every member of the household from daybreak until after dark. Then, on winter nights, the Tyrolese peasants play.

Dancing is a favorite amusement after the day’s work, and this is all the more surprising because the dances of Tyrol are more strenuous than those of Russia or Poland. To swing your partner up to the ceiling, and to fall down and spring up again without using the hands for support are among the “steps” of a good dancer’s repertoire.

While the dancing couple excitedly swing and caper, the others sing and play the zither, the favorite Tyrolese musical instrument. Original songs are in high favor, and also the old folk songs of princes and peasants, shepherdesses and hunstmen. The peasants sing lustily and well. Only a realization of tomorrow’s work puts an end to the affair, and sends guests trooping home still whistling or humming the last song.

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The Mediator

Omaha, Nebraska, August 8, 1919

Customary figure as the boy scout has become in the United States, General Baden-Powell’s visit added much to American knowledge of the movement. A good many newspaper readers were probably surprised to learn that it owes its beginning to the Boer war and the siege of Mafeking, without which it may be questioned whether there would be any boy scouts. In command at Mafeking, General Baden-Powell looked far beyond the siege and saw that a great and useful organization of boys might be developed from the corps of boy messengers organized to serve the forces holding that hard-pressed town. That was the beginning of it, but the same force of character that defended Mafeking carried forward the boy scout idea until it was generally recognized as a project for character building rather than encouraging militarism in the young. Another bit of information that probably surprised many Americans was that Baden-Powell is descended on his mother’s side from Capt. John Smith.

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